judgement


October 8, 2014 + He Who Tends to His Own Vices is Incapable of Condemning His Brother

On seeing someone sinning, a holy man wept bitterly and said: "He has fallen today, and I will surely fall tomorrow; he will assuredly repent, but as for myself, I am not sure if I will repent."

The Evergetinos: A Complete Text, Vol. 3, Edited and Translated by Archbp. Chrysostomos and Hieromonk Patapios, Center for Traditionalist Orthodox Studies, 2008, p. 12.

March 30, 2011 + Judge Not Lest You Be Judged

by Very Rev. Stephen Rogers
from The Word, March 2000

In the Prologue from Ochrid, that wonderful collection of the lives of the saints compiled by St. Nicholai Velimirovich, we hear a marvelous account on the thirtieth day of this month.  On this day, an unnamed monk is commemorated who is described as “lazy, careless, disinclined to prayer . . .”  Hardly the description we would expect of a monk commemorated by the Church!

We are told that, when this monk lay dying, he was full of joy. His fellow monks, who knew well the lack­luster efforts of their brother, were confused how one so seemingly negligent could be facing death so joyfully.  They asked him how this could be and he responded:  “I have seen the angels, and they showed me a page with all my many sins.  I said to them:  The Lord said, ‘Judge not, that ye be not judged.’  I have never judged anyone and I hope in the mercy of God, that He will not judge me.”

The dying monk ended the account by telling his brothers that the angels, upon hearing that the monk had never judged anyone, immediately tore up the long list of his sins.

The story ends by telling us that all the monks marveled at this and learned from it.

There is probably nothing to which our Lord attached a greater warning than judging our brother.

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with what judgment you judge, you will be judged and with the same measure you use, it will be measured back to you” (Matthew 7:1-2).

The Last Judgement (Meat-Fare Sunday)

The Following is an excerpt from Great Lent, by Alexander Schmemann
From Chapter 2: Preparation for Lent

....

It is love again that constitutes the theme of "Meat-Fare Sunday." The Gospel lesson for the day is Christ's parable of the Last Judgement (Matt. 25:31-46). When Christ comes to judge us, what will be the criterion of His judgement? The parable answers: love-- not a mere humanitarian concern for abstract justice and the anonymous "poor," but concrete and personal love for the human person, any human person, that God makes me encounter in my life....

Christian love is the "possible impossibility" to see Christ in another man, whoever he is, and whom God, in His eternal and mysterious plan, has decided to introduce into my life, be it only for a few moments, not as an occasion for a "good deed" or an exercise in philanthropy, but as the beginning of an eternal companionship in God Himself. For, indeed, what is love if not that mysterious power which transcends the accidental and the external in the "other"-- his physical appearance, social rank, ethnic origin, intellectual capacity-- and reaches the soul, the unique and uniquely personal "root" of a human being, truly the part of God in him? If God loves every man it is because He alone knows the priceless and absolutely unique treasure, the "soul" or "person" He gave every man. Christian love then is the participation in that divine knowledge and the gift of that divine love. There is no "impersonal" love because love is the wonderful discovery of the "person" in "man," of the personal and unique in the common and general. It is the discovery in each man of that which is "lovable" in him, of that which is from God.