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The Antiochian Orthodox Department of Christian Education (AODCE) supports church school directors, teachers, parents, and all who participate in the work of Christian education on the local level. Read more. 


The Christian Ed Materials and Order Form (PDF, rev. 08-18-16) is now available for download! Download and use this new form to order materials for your parish program! Be sure to see the revised Billing and Shipping/handling sections of the Order Form. Also, visit the Antiochian Village Bookstore and Giftshop for your holiday gift needs for Sunday School and home.

AVAILABLE SOON

Curriculum. "Orthodoxy FAQs" and "'I Came:" Jesus in His Own Words" as mentioned in The Word, will be available soon. Check each week. Nearest completion is Orthodoxy FAQS (frequently-asked-questions) which has been renamed ORTHOFAQs Challenge. Consisting of four curriculum pieces, each with seven lessons, Challenges 1 and 2 have questions appropriate for middle school students and numbers 3 and 4 have questions for high school students. The teaching plan can be whole-group, small-group, or individual-research. "'I Came:" Jesus in His Own Words" is a seven-lesson unit inspired by The Great "I Cames" of Jesus, written by Fr. Anthony Coniaris.
Faith and Culture Page. Still under construction!

If you are interested in the Curriculum Project, "Walking the Path of Salvation," its website is: www.antiochian.org/christianeducation/curriculumplan. You will find the Concept Paper, the preparatory tasks and updates on the progress. You can also follow the project on Facebook: "CB Path of Salvation Curriculum Plan."

 

FEATURED EVENT

Review of 2016 Pan-Orthodox Continuing Education Conferences

The Department of Christian Education expanded training by taking "the show on the road" this year. Building on the success of "The Orthodox Institute for Continuing Education in the Faith," the department hosted three major events and several smaller trainings during the year with the goal of making training and spiritual enrichment accessible to those who cannot travel to Antiochian Village.

The first of our Pan-Orthodox Continuing Education Conferences was hosted by St. Elias Antiochian Orthodox Cathedral, Ottawa, Ontario, on Friday evening and Saturday, September 23-24. Matushka Jennifer Mosher, a doctoral student in Christian Education, spoke on "Christian Education: Forming the Whole Person." We thank Fr. Ghattas Hajal, Pastor, and Kelly Hamwi, Church School Director, for arranging this event with Fr. Christopher Rigden-Briscall, Department Coordinator. At this conference, 28 teachers completed Teacher Training I, 4 individuals completed the Church School Director courses and 8 completed Mat. Jenny's theme track. Participants came from the Greek, Romanian and Antiochian churches in the area.

 

FEATURED ARTICLE FOR DIRECTORS

Original Christmas Pageant Available for Download

Now available for download! An original Christmas pageant entitled Out of Egypt, written by Rebekah Yergo, the Church School Director at St. John Chrysostom Orthodox Church in York, PA, is available for use in your parish. The pageant was successfully performed in 2015; the writing, stage preparations, and costumes were a hit with the children, who felt like they were in a real production.

Additionally, attached is the sheet music that is used in the production.

View photos of the pageant

FEATURED ARTICLE FOR TEACHERS 

Saints of Recent Decades: St. Maria of Paris

Commemorated July 20 or August 2

In 1891, in Riga, Latvia, a baby girl named Elizabeta (“Liza,” to her family) was born to the Pilenko family. The Pilenkos were Orthodox Christians, and raised Liza in the faith. When she was 14, Liza’s father died, and Liza was so upset that she gave up her Faith. When the family moved to St. Petersburg, instead of going to church, Liza began to hang out with radical people who, like her, liked to read and wanted to make the world better. They would spend hours talking about revolution and about theology, but (in Liza’s words) they “seemed to do nothing but talk.” She wanted to actually DO something to make a change. Years passed, and Liza slowly came back to her faith.

FEATURED ARTICLE FOR PARENTS 

Liturgy of Bedtime

by Albert Rossi, Ph.D., St. Vladimir's Seminary

One of the more regular times of "Letting the children come" to God is bedtime. Often stories and prayers at bedtime can be relaxed, non-competitive time with children. When everything is right, bedtime can be a time when the unconditional love of parent for child is almost tangible. Children are usually tired and sometimes less frenetic. It also goes without saying that some nights seem more like thinly veiled chaos. But, hopefully, most nights are more peaceful.

Going to sleep for children happens gracefully only within an elaborate ritual. This is the liturgy of going to sleep and is not totally unlike other liturgies. Father Alexander Schmemann spoke of the Eucharist beginning with the long ritual of getting dressed for Church and continuing through the trip to Church and all the beautiful liturgy preceding Communion. In a similar way, children go to sleep after intricate ceremony. This usually includes taking a bath, putting on pajamas, brushing their teeth, kissing everyone in the household goodnight, hearing a story, saying prayers, getting tucked in, and for little ones, a Linus blanket and Teddy for special security. This is the liturgy of bedtime. It's a tender time, a loving time. It's a rare and precious time. It's a time to be close to each other and to God.